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2 edition of Nuptiality Patterns in Developing Countries: Implications for Fertility found in the catalog.

Nuptiality Patterns in Developing Countries: Implications for Fertility

Jane S. Durch

Nuptiality Patterns in Developing Countries: Implications for Fertility

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Population Reference Bureau in Washington .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination43 p. :
Number of Pages43
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26622414M

  Population and Society brings together twenty-six classic and contemporary published works that are considered to be foundational reading for the study of human population and society. The book is divided into ten sections with concise introductory overviews by the editor, Frank Trovato. Section one examines the foundational principles of demography and its nature as a multidisciplinary : $ Acquah, I. Accra Survey: A Social Survey of the Capital of Ghana, Formerly Called the Gold Coast, Undertaken by the West African Institute of Social and Economic Research, – London: University of London Press. Adadevoh, S.W.K., T.K. Agble, C. Hobbs, and T.E. Elkins Menarcheal ages in Ghanaian school girls. G. Nuptiality and the Family. the second section examines developing countries, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean; and the third section concentrates on studies concerning Brazil. "This paper assesses the effects of change in women's education and labor force participation on nuptiality patterns and their implications for. While lower fertility rates, changing family patterns, population ageing and the rapid growth in women's economic activity can be shown to provoke policy responses, evidence for a causal impact of policy on demographic behaviour and for the diffusion of policies between countries is inconclusive.


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Nuptiality Patterns in Developing Countries: Implications for Fertility by Jane S. Durch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nuptiality patterns in developing countries: implications for fertility. [Jane Durch; Population Reference Bureau.] -- Patterns of age at 1st marriage, the stability of marriages, and patterns of marital fertility in 15 developing countries were examined.

This report, based on World Fertility Survey data from 15 selected Asian and Latin American countries, examines patterns in the formation and dissolution of marital unions and the relationship of these patterns to fertility.

In brief, the data indicate that: a. In Asia age at first marriage varies widely among countries, but nearly every country considered shows evidence of a trend toward Cited by: 1. Author(s): Durch,J S Title(s): Nuptiality patterns in developing countries: implications for fertility/ J.S.

Durch. Country of Publication: United States. Fertility implications of nuptiality patterns in South Asia. D'souza S. PIP: The author presents an overview of nuptiality in South Asia, with particular reference to India and Bangladesh, and of the effect of nuptiality on fertility. Data are from censuses and national surveys.

The characteristics of nuptiality over the past century, Author: D'souza S. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http Author: Jane. Durch and Population Reference Bureau. The literature on nuptiality and its effect on fertility in developing countries has been dominated by observations from Asia and tropical Africa, however.

Nuptiality and family patterns in Latin America are intermediate between those in Western Europe and those in Asia or Africa (Merrick ; De Vos ).Cited by:   Focuses on fertility and family transitions in selected Third World countries, exploring critical aspects of the relationship between population and development.

The essays examine population processes as they unfold and develop over time, highlighting the need to go beyond economic explanations and identifying the priorities among social structuraBook Edition: 1st Edition.

In Eastern and Central Europe on the other hand, where marriage customarily occurred earlier and was more nearly universal, a somewhat slower fertility transition was achieved through a reduction in marital fertility - without any drastic accompanying nuptiality change. Populations of developing countries, however, commonly exhibit nuptiality patterns characterized by a still higher incidence and a considerably younger age-pattern Cited by: In the European historical experience, nuptiality patterns played a very significant role in the development of low fertility.

Late marriage and widespread celibacy provided one of the mechanisms by which age-specific fertility rates were brought to low levels in the populations of Western by:   Changes in marriage patterns have been seen as precursors of demographic transition in most societies Changes in nuptiality patterns have played a very significant role in many European demographic transitions In Western Europe, people typically stay single longer, leading to later first marriages.

The combination of widespread celibacy and the trend of later marriage has led to lower fertility by: 9. In Eastern and Central Europe on the other hand, where marriage customarily occurred earlier and was more nearly universal, a somewhat slower fertility transition was achieved through a reduction Nuptiality Patterns in Developing Countries: Implications for Fertility book marital fertility - without any drastic accompanying nuptiality change.

Populations of developing countries, however, commonly exhibit nuptiality patterns characterized by a still higher incidence and a considerably younger age-pattern Cited by: NUPTIALITY AND FERTILITY. Age Patterns Levels and Trends. Determinants of Fertility in Developing Countries: A Summary of Knowledge Determinants of Fertility in Developing Countries: A Summary of Knowledge, National Research Council (U.S.).

Panel on Fertility Determinants. This research studies the nuptiality patterns in Egypt and the Maghreb countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia. Despite the importance of nuptiality as a demographic component, it is.

The core of demographic analysis focuses on three processes that alter a population’s size and age and sex structure: fertility, mortality, and migration.

To these one could add nuptiality, or marriage patterns, as a key process with a close connection to fertility by: Finally, fertility and nuptiality patterns may be affected by the recent implementation of structural adjustment programs by several African governments in response to worsening economic conditions.

It is unclear whether any crisis-induced reductions in fertility would be sustainable for long periods of time. stances which condition this phenomenon and its implications are less known. Of interest here is the link between rising gravidity and fertility and its implications; the role of nuptiality in increasing natural fertility at an early stage of demographic change in a population with a non European(l) marriage pattern among women exposed to.

The average TFR for the world was and for other developing countries it was China's controversial 1 child per family policy was adopted in after the birth rate had already Author: Nikolai Botev.

The increasing gap between developed and developing world will be one of the most important themes of the 21st century. The contributions contained in this volume take a multidisciplinary approach to the problem, offering a comprehensive review of the theoretical issues and empirical findings that relate to the complex and multidirectional link between poverty and demographic behaviours and.

Fig. 1 shows that in countries like Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States of America a considerable increase in the singulate mean age at marriage of both men and Cited by: Female age at marriage is of a great importance due to its direct relationship with the level of fertility in the developing countries where the contraceptive use rate is low.

The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries: however, that “weaknesses in the field of nuptiality research stem from its heavy focus on the fertility implications of nuptiality patterns” (Smith,p.

In charging his fellow demographers to think more broadly about the subject of marriage, van de Walle (, p. the “reading one, skipping one” pattern. Few persons, even among demographers, will fully comprehend, for example, all four of the following: Ryder’s procedure for assessing the rel­ ative importance of the quality and tempo of nuptiality and marital parity for changes in the level of period fertility; Easter.

The decline of fertility in Europe Book. January ; are important determinants of fertility decline in both developed and developing countries. patterns, nuptiality, fertility, and. The pattern of the exam has been changed from 3 papers (Paper I, II & III) to 2 papers (Paper I & II). Now, there are 50 MCQs in Paper 1 and MCQs in Paper 2.

Each question carries 2 marks without any NEGATIVE marking for the wrong answer. There is no break between Paper 1 and Paper 2. UGC NET Syllabus for Population Studies. The changing nuptiality patterns of developing countries are of great importance in view of the tremendous impact such changes may have on fertility change.

and the implications of SAPTA to. High fertility rates can have an adverse effect on the health of women and children, especially in developing countries that lack a health infrastructure. Every year, an estimated women die in pregnancy or childbirth (WHO, ), and for every woman who dies as many as 30 others suffer chronic illness or disability (Ashford ).

The Impact of Women's Social Position on Fertility in Developing Countries Karen Oppenheim Mason University of Michigan This paper examines ideas about possible ways in which the ex- tent of women's autonomy, women's economic dependency, and other aspects of their position vis-h-vis men influence fertility in.

Economic Development and Cultural Change Demeny, P. () On the end of the population explosion. Population and Development Review Duncan, O. () Introduction to Structural Equation Models. New l York: Academic Press.

Durch, J. () Nuptiality Patterns in Developing Countries: Implications for Fertility. Population and Society brings together twenty-six classic and contemporary published works that are considered to be foundational reading for the study of human population and book is divided into ten sections with concise introductory overviews by the editor, Frank Trovato.

Section one examines the foundational principles of demography and its nature as a multidisciplinary field. Durch, Jane. Overview. Nuptiality patterns in developing countries: implications for fertility by Jane Durch Patterns of age at 1st marriage, the stability of marriages, and patterns of marital fertility in 15 developing countries were examined.

Survey results for 9 Asian and 6 Latin American countries. This book analyses the specific demographic implications and conditioning factors of women's experience of poverty. By investigating the different experiences that women in developing countries face in attempting to escape from poverty, the contributors illustrate the importance of incorporating the gender perspective into population studies.

Children born outside marriage have become more common, and in some countries, the majority. Recent data from Latin America showed figures for non-marital childbearing to be 74% for Colombia, 69% for Peru, 68% for Chile, 66% for Brazil, 58% for Argentina, 55% for Mexico. IMPLICATIONS OF HISTORICAL FERTILITY STUDIES graphic experience and that of developing countries today, as well as non-Western European countries in the past, should be borne in mind: the difference in nuptiality patterns.

Western European populations dur-ing at least the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries were character. Fertility, Nuptiality, and Family Limitation Among the Wends of Serbin, Texas, to Show all authors.

Natural Fertility: Age Patterns, Levels, and Trends. 61 – in Determinants of Fertility in Developing Countries: A Summary Cited by: 5. In conclusion, unmarried motherhood is obviously a common nuptiality pattern in contemporary Africa. With its diverse implications for well-being, family-oriented policies, programmes and studies have become more : Lorretta Favour Chizomam Ntoimo, Nyasha Mutanda.

Get this from a library. Economic equality and fertility in developing countries. [Robert C Repetto; Resources for the Future.] -- This book briefly reviews sociological, economic, and demographic literature pertaining to the relationship between income and fertility in developed and developing countries.

Part 2 Transitions in Asia: sociodemographic determinants of the fertility transition in Korea, Doo Sub Kim; the social context of fertility decline in Thailand, Philip Guest and Aphichat Chamratrithirong; nuptiality patterns in Thailand - their implications for further fertility decline, Bhassorn Limanonda; relationships between maternal.

more than 40% of the population, a figure that approaches 75% in developing countries. As a result, rural demographic change is of vital importance. This article monitors four driving factors in rural demographic change including the ratio of youth to the aged, the ratio of males to female, fertility.

Methodological studies on nuptiality and the family are coded in this division and cross-referenced to N. Methods of Research and Nuptiality and marriage patterns in Istanbul ().

Samuel H.; Strong, Michael A. Effects of mortality declines on marriage patterns in developing countries. In: Consequences of mortality trends and. Author(s): Chesnais, Jean-Claude. Abstract: This book examines the basic mechanisms behind the modernization of demographic behaviour.

The author has marshalled an impressive amount of statistical material relating to 67 countries, half of them less developed, and covering the period The whole sweep of western demographic experience is dealt with comprehensively and impartially. Developed countries are past the 'bonus' phase.

Most developing countries will soon experince a peak point of the demographic 'bonus'. Asia 'bonus' has peaked recently/Latin America will peak soon. China is now declining. Afirca will peak in Reducing Fertility in Bangladesh Geographic area: Bangladesh Health condition: in the mid- s, a Bangladeshi woman had more than six children on average.

in com-bination with poor nutrition and lack of access to quality health services, this high fertility rate jeopardized the File Size: KB.FIGURE Trends in ideal number of children and total fertility rates.

SOURCE: Casterline (). NOTE: Samples for each region were Eastern and Southern Africa, 18 countries, 60 surveys; Central and West Africa, 20 countries, 70 surveys; Latin America, 18 countries, 72 surveys; and Asia and North Africa, 27 countries, 89 surveys.